Event Title

Obligations of Grace

Event Type

Open Access

Location

London, UK

Start Date

5-2016 12:00 AM

Description

Grace obliges recipients to respond in gratitude and obedience to God, the giver of grace. While the New Testament emphasizes God's grace given through Jesus Christ in a New Covenant with believers, the Old Testament emphasizes grace more than many Christians recognize. Grace is expressed in the Old Testament especially through God's free choosing of Abraham as the "father of the faithful," through divine covenants with Abraham, with the divinely constituted nation of Israel, and with the governing house of David. Such grace abounds when God's covenanted people fail to keep their covenant, yet God, after disciplining the covenant people even severely, keeps covenant with his people, showing his ongoing "steadfast love" (nearly synonymous with NT "grace"). In Jesus Christ, this grace abounds even more, which the New Testament writings express in marvelous unity. But such grace rightly elicits appropriate responses. From stipulations in the Old Testament Torah that carry over into the life of the first Jesus followers to the expectations of the grace that greased the patron-client system of the first-century world of the earliest Christians, grace obliges recipients to gratitude and loyal action on behalf of the giver of grace.

 
May 1st, 12:00 AM

Obligations of Grace

London, UK

Grace obliges recipients to respond in gratitude and obedience to God, the giver of grace. While the New Testament emphasizes God's grace given through Jesus Christ in a New Covenant with believers, the Old Testament emphasizes grace more than many Christians recognize. Grace is expressed in the Old Testament especially through God's free choosing of Abraham as the "father of the faithful," through divine covenants with Abraham, with the divinely constituted nation of Israel, and with the governing house of David. Such grace abounds when God's covenanted people fail to keep their covenant, yet God, after disciplining the covenant people even severely, keeps covenant with his people, showing his ongoing "steadfast love" (nearly synonymous with NT "grace"). In Jesus Christ, this grace abounds even more, which the New Testament writings express in marvelous unity. But such grace rightly elicits appropriate responses. From stipulations in the Old Testament Torah that carry over into the life of the first Jesus followers to the expectations of the grace that greased the patron-client system of the first-century world of the earliest Christians, grace obliges recipients to gratitude and loyal action on behalf of the giver of grace.