Presenter Information

Joshua Banda

Event Type

Papers Read

Location

Ocean 6

Event Website

http://www.empowered21asia.com/

Start Date

30-5-2017 9:45 AM

Description

Abstract

The HIV/AIDS pandemic ranks fairly high among notable global phenomena that have to a great extent ‘reframed’ the narrative on human sexuality in various contexts over the past three (3) decades. Related discourses have been witnessed in diverse fora, ranging from house-hold settings to academia lofts, churches to political podia, board rooms that churn global policies to electronic and print media production centers, to name but a few. The bulk of such engagements have sought to highlight the AIDS scourge with the intent to catalyze life saving societal responses. However, the efforts by respective Actors in this respect, have not been without tension.

This Paper utilizes anecdotal personal reflections, alongside empirical evidence to highlight enigmatic tensions between conventional public health approaches (to HIV Prevention/sexuality) promulgated largely by donor-backed entities on one hand and spiritually-based sexual behaviour change ideals propagated by Faith-based Organizations (FBOs) on the other hand in general, and Churches in particular.

The Paper brings to light, disconcerting detail showing that some entities promoting conventional public health approaches have tended to raise sustained apprehensions towards spiritually-based sexual behaviour change programmes. It is observable that the apprehensions are mainly as a result of over-emphasis on sexual reproductive health rights, as it is alleged by the said entities that the Churches essentially may be stifling individual choices of young people. Surprisingly, this is despite growing evidence since as far back as 1992 when, high level Agencies like the World Health Organisation (WHO), observed that FBO initiatives such as abstinence and marital fidelity, might constitute strategies capable of completely eliminating the risk of infection from HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).[1]

The Paper presents relevant findings from a study undertaken in Lusaka, Zambia (2007-2014) that focused on congregation-based HIV Programmes and explored whether a person’s sexual behaviour may be influenced by their attitude and behaviour towards God. A case is made for spiritually-based ethical transformation anchored on biblical teaching in an African Pentecostal setting.

[1] Joshua HK Banda (2017), Impacts of Congregation-based HIV/AIDS Programmes In Lusaka, Zambia: How Abstinence and Marital Fidelity Efforts Function In Overall Strategies Addressing HIV/AIDS. PhD Thesis, OCMS/Middlesex, United Kingdom.

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May 30th, 9:45 AM

Study 9: Sexuality in the Context of Rights-Based Approaches to HIV Prevention: Interplay between International Polity and Spiritually-Based Sexual Behaviour Change: An African Pentecostal Perspective

Ocean 6

Abstract

The HIV/AIDS pandemic ranks fairly high among notable global phenomena that have to a great extent ‘reframed’ the narrative on human sexuality in various contexts over the past three (3) decades. Related discourses have been witnessed in diverse fora, ranging from house-hold settings to academia lofts, churches to political podia, board rooms that churn global policies to electronic and print media production centers, to name but a few. The bulk of such engagements have sought to highlight the AIDS scourge with the intent to catalyze life saving societal responses. However, the efforts by respective Actors in this respect, have not been without tension.

This Paper utilizes anecdotal personal reflections, alongside empirical evidence to highlight enigmatic tensions between conventional public health approaches (to HIV Prevention/sexuality) promulgated largely by donor-backed entities on one hand and spiritually-based sexual behaviour change ideals propagated by Faith-based Organizations (FBOs) on the other hand in general, and Churches in particular.

The Paper brings to light, disconcerting detail showing that some entities promoting conventional public health approaches have tended to raise sustained apprehensions towards spiritually-based sexual behaviour change programmes. It is observable that the apprehensions are mainly as a result of over-emphasis on sexual reproductive health rights, as it is alleged by the said entities that the Churches essentially may be stifling individual choices of young people. Surprisingly, this is despite growing evidence since as far back as 1992 when, high level Agencies like the World Health Organisation (WHO), observed that FBO initiatives such as abstinence and marital fidelity, might constitute strategies capable of completely eliminating the risk of infection from HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).[1]

The Paper presents relevant findings from a study undertaken in Lusaka, Zambia (2007-2014) that focused on congregation-based HIV Programmes and explored whether a person’s sexual behaviour may be influenced by their attitude and behaviour towards God. A case is made for spiritually-based ethical transformation anchored on biblical teaching in an African Pentecostal setting.

[1] Joshua HK Banda (2017), Impacts of Congregation-based HIV/AIDS Programmes In Lusaka, Zambia: How Abstinence and Marital Fidelity Efforts Function In Overall Strategies Addressing HIV/AIDS. PhD Thesis, OCMS/Middlesex, United Kingdom.

http://digitalshowcase.oru.edu/e21scholars/2017/30May17/7